Chronic Subdural hematoma

Definition of chronic subdural hematoma

Definition of chronic subdural hematoma

 

Chronic subdural hematoma (cSDH) is a condition where a pool of blood slowly collects between the surface of the brain and the brain’s outer covering called the dura. This is caused by blood seeping from small, bridging veins at the surface of the brain, often as a result of a very mild trauma. This condition is often seen in elderly patients and, if the hematoma grows large enough, can cause headaches, gait imbalance, and stroke-like symptoms due to the blood pushing on the brain. The incidence of chronic subdural hematoma (cSDH) is believed to be increasing due to the aging patient population and increased use of anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents.

 

 

 

 

Symptoms of chronic subdural hematoma

Symptoms of chronic subdural hematoma

 

Symptoms of chronic subdural hematoma (cSDH) include :

  • headache
  • coordination difficulty
  • memory impairment
  • vision problems
  • seizures
  • confusion
  • numbness of face or limbs
  • speech difficulty
  • nausea/vomiting
  • weakness or paralysis

 

 

Treatments for chronic subdural hematoma

Treatments for chronic subdural hematoma

 

 

If a patient requires treatment for their chronic subdural hematomac (cSDH), the typical treatment involves open surgical approaches and drainage of the hematoma. However, significant research is underway to assess the role of endovascular treatments for this disease state.